NAHBS Cheesecake, 2018 Edition

You know you can’t get enough.

I was expecting to see more of this.  Exquisite work and great finishes.

 

 

 

 

Mosaic received a Metrea group from Shimano and built this up for it. Don’t think this is getting locked up and left on the sidewalk.

I guess Boo Bicycles did, too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This 36er coffee shop bike was judged the best artisan bike of the show.  Black Sheep had built a 36er before this, and had even raced it, so he had a sense of how it handles and what it needed to be something you could easily ride.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Crust/Sklar Nutmegger was the hard-riding, incredibly personal bike that deserves respect from bike geeks.  Check out the Simplex retrofriction downtube shifter mated to what appeared to be a custom SunTour Superbe Pro rear derailleur.  To use that derailleur with a 40-tooth cog, a hanger had to be made to get the derailleur low enough.  The handlebars are mountain bike wide and have a slight sweep to them,the drops are canted outward–an ultra-wide randonneuring bar you could easily mtb on.

 

 

 

 

This is the Farfold.  The front wheel is the thing your drawn to.  The flanges are high so that the hub and three spokes can be removed so the front wheel can sit flat next to the rear wheel, which itself can have the cassette and cassette body pulled.  Remember, it has to go into a 26 x 26 x 10 container.  To get the frame in there, the clamp around the seatpost base has to be opened and then the back half folded under the front half, with the fork sitting between the stays.  The bars unfold straight forward and the stem is turned so the bars are parallel with the top tube.

 

This is the Farfold.  The front wheel is the thing your drawn to.  The flanges are high so that the hub and three spokes can be removed so the front wheel can sit flat next to the rear wheel, which itself can have the cassette and cassette body pulled.  Remember, it has to go into a 26 x 26 x 10 container.  To get the frame in there, the clamp around the seatpost base has to be opened and then the back half folded under the front half, with the fork sitting between the stays.  The bars unfold straight forward and the stem is turned so the bars are parallel with the top tube.

 

 

 

 

Would you go fast on this wheel?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember, it’s a prototype.  The next version should be lighter and better-looking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vermeulen expects to slim down some of this on the next one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cables are long enough to fold over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A head tube mold by students at Cal Poly’s bike building club.

 

 

 

 

 

Allied finished the stem and frame to show off their paintworks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanridge’s 3Rensho tribute track bike.

Not UCI-legal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not one,but two drop-bar ebikes. The first from SaltAir.  The second from Fenix.

Fenix Drop Bar Commuter. The builder rides it to work, a 50-mile round trip. There was also a second drop-bar ebike at the show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Kansas’ Cyclolab spared no expense in their sign-making.

 

 

 

 

 

While the idea of their bamboo bike similarly cheap, that’s also the point.  The banana seat is to remove the complication/failure point of an adjustable seatpost.  The fork moves on bushings.  The axles are secured to the tubes via quill and steel wire.

 

 

 

No alley is rando.

 

 

 

Chris Chance is back.  This is the update of his classic Slim Chance road bike.  Back in the day, he had an elegant steel fork.  Some things need to change, I suppose.

 

 

 

 

A Bilenky cargo ebike.

A person in the booth said it was a customer’s bike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A travel time trial tandem. The stoker’s stem adjusts on the top tube. Though I don’t know about the extension placement.

 

 

A No22 track bike.  They claim these are being sold to messengers in New York City.  Even without the anodizing, even stickered up to look junkyard, bikes get stolen, just cuz.

 

 

 

Machined titanium lugs.  Somebody is swooning.

 

 

 

Silca was giving out Imperos to builders so they could match them to their frames.  No22 pulled the aluminum shaft, replaced it with an anodized titanium shaft and even anodized an easter egg.

I expected to see more of these. Love the lugwork, the classic chroming and color. Even the fitting of the battery is well-done.  Another commuter bike I don’t see getting locked up.

 

Squid repurposes old tools.
Look on the wall and you’ll see how Squid decorates samples to send to customers.

 




 

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